NOW IS THE TIME TO LEARN ABOUT THE DIGITAL

The Digital Scholarships Fellowship is a year-long collaborative program that integrates digital tools, theory, and methods with undergraduate academia. We welcome applicants from any disciplinary background, with any level of technical expertise; the aim of the program is to provide a stimulating and challenging experience for students interested in exploring digital scholarship, regardless of whether they have extensive experience using digital tools or are learning about digital scholarship for the first time. Applicants should ideally be sophomores or juniors, though we will also consider first-years in some cases. Fellows are expected to be on campus during the entirety of the 2016-2017 academic year.

FROM FELLOWSHIP TO INTERNSHIP

The eight students selected to become DS fellows will participate in biweekly workshops that run through the year, on topics such as web design; project and information management; data analysis; accessibility; and digital tools for text analysis. They will also work together to develop and build a digital scholarship project of their own. At the end of the academic year, each fellow will have the opportunity to participate in a paid summer internship related to digital scholarship in the Philadelphia area.

ANATOMY OF INFORMATION

Starting with some of our rare and special materials, we’ll start this digital program with a conversation about the history of media types. How have communities shared data, information, and stories, and how have the technologies they used shaped and been shaped by the kinds of stories they seek to tell? What are some of the historical contexts for the digital technologies we use today?

BEAUTIFUL WEBSITES IN THE CLOUDS

When you open a browser, go to a website and start using it, what is happening? What is the internet? How do servers work? What makes web pages possible? What makes them beautiful, interactive, etc.? In this session, each student will be given their own domain name and a simple process for creating a personal website for use throughout the project.

PUBLIC MEMORY AND THE OFFICIAL RECORD

A crash course on classification processes, libraries, scholarly process, and open access.

SCHOLARLY PROJECT MANAGEMENT

How can a project be managed and sustained over a long period of time? What are some ways of documenting procedures? Of coordinating multiple contributors? Of preserving institutional memory?

COLLABORATION, LABOR, AND INFRASTRUCTURE

What are all of the forms of work that go into a digital project? What happens when we attempt to reverse-engineer various DS projects?

COPYRIGHT, PLAGIARISM, PROVENANCE, PIRACY, AND TERMS OF SERVICE

How do individuals’, groups’, and institutions’ claims on the materials they create and transform interact with each other? Using Monument Lab as a case study, we will design a procedure for handling intellectual property and attribution in a project centered around public participation, with multiple contributors.

DATA MANAGEMENT

How do we move from raw to more structured data? What is metadata, and what can it do for you? We’ll work with programs such as OpenRefine and Microsoft Excel to explore different ways of managing, cleaning, and analyzing data.

INCLUSION, ACCESS, AND PARTICIPATION

What makes a scholarly work accessible, and for whom? We’ll consider inclusion, access, and participation in terms of disability, language, institutional access, and other categories.

DESIGN AND MEDIA

The scholarly and popular landscapes are increasingly multimedia, with complex images, video and sound available. In this workshop, students will learn the fundamentals of creating and manipulating images in Photoshop, exploring 3D printing, and making simple video content. They will also learn about tools available for further learning in this area.

THE PLEASURES AND PERILS OF MACHINE READING

What digital tools can be used to interpret a large (or small) corpus of text? Using tools such as the Stanford NER, MALLET, and Scott Enderle’s topic modeling tool, we will explore various possibilities for digital text analysis and consider what a human interpreter might do with their outputs.